My Super Falcons Diary, Day 5: So Cameroonians really eat unripe plantain?

L-R Olowokere Busayo, Chibuogwu Nnadiegbulam, a fan, Faith Oluchi, Tobi Adepoju, Sam Ahmadu
By Chibuogwu
Nnadiegbulam
It
was a really cold night because of the heavy rain that fell while we slept.
Nonetheless, I woke up at about 9am, feeling a lot refreshed.
Between
10 am and 1:30pm, I finished up my diary of day three and four, visited
Facebook and Twitter, ate breakfast – bread, scrambled eggs and tea.
Faith
and Carine had gone to the market in between, so when they came back, I joined
them in the kitchen.
It
was dinner we were fixing, because Carine’s sister had already promised to host
us for lunch. And Plantain Porridge was the meal to be prepared. So I helped to
cut the ripe bunch to small cube sizes, while Faith handled the unripe.
When
I was done, I faced onions, before chopping the ‘ugu’ leaves needed for the
food.
While
we were at it, Mr. Wisdom’s (Carine’s brother) wife, stepped in. She said it
was break time at the bank where she works. She asked us what we wanted to cook
and we told her. To satisfy her curiosity of how it is prepared, Faith did the
honours.
By
this time, Tobi and Busayo had come from Limbe. They want to relocate to Buea.
Some minutes to the Super Falcon’s evening training, they – alongside Sam –
left for the Buea Molyko Stadium where the training would take place. Mr.
Moses, Faith, Carine and I, joined them some minutes later.
Desire
Oparanozie seemed like she was still struggling to be match-fit. She did not
partake in the full training session, however coach Florence Omagbemi in an
interview with journalists after the session said Oparanozie will have her
opportunity to play, like the other players in the team.
After
training, we all went to visit Carine’s elder sister, whose house is opposite
the University of Buea.
She
served boiled unripe plantain and huckleberry with beef for dinner. Faith,
Carine and I did not even see the meal, not to talk of eating, because we left
the house almost immediately and went to the Super Falcons hotel which is
located in one of the coldest areas of the South West region.
I
can’t really tell how the discussion started, but the driver of the cab we
entered claimed that international calls to Nigeria were cheap. Faith and I
exclaimed and started narrating our ordeal. I had recharged with CFA 1000 and
it was gone in three minutes of talking with my mum. I don’t even trust data
subscription either.
After
the Cameroonian driver realized we were Nigerians, he said “you people are
going to take the cup”. We hailed him first and asked him why he thought
so and he added, “I like the way you play. You play good football.
“But
your players need to adjust they are too fat. They will meet Cameroon in the
final and Cameroon are very swift,” he concluded.
The
driver, who was live at the stadium on Sunday, went on to express his love for
Nigeria’s “number 6”, who happens to be left back, Ngozi Ebere. She
came in as substitute for Ugo Njoku in the second half of the 6-0 victory over
Mali.
We
were at the hotel reception by the time the Super Falcons were going to have
dinner. As they walked past in small groups, the players first and then
officials, coach Florence Omagbemi recognised me and reminded me that she still
had the photo we took together at the final of the FIFA U17 Women’s World Cup
in Jordan.
Soon,
Carine and I left Faith behind at the hotel. Carine said she would come back
for Faith. So we went back to her elder sister’s house, ate our share of the
huckleberry meal and took some for Faith.

Back
at the house, while Carine went back to the Super Falcons hotel for Faith, I
had to cook quick jollof rice for Mr. Moses, who didn’t want to eat plantain porridge.
And I can still feel the effect of the pepper I chopped as I type this.

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